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Charlie Sheen: The Best Drug for Your Company

By christinewatson / / If you’re happy to exploit the brain of a drug-addled actor/madman on the path to absolute destruction, then boy, have we got the marketing concept for you! Okay, so we, like everyone else, cannot stop watching Charlie Sheen’s slow-mo train wreck of a life. It’s got all the makings of a perfect drama: drugs, sex, delusion, money. But one other aspect of the scandal caught our eye. That’s right, Egotists, Charlie Sheen is providing a little something extra for you– tech marketing. Sheen started a twitter a few days back so that he could broadcast his “thoughts” to the world. But it turns out that a startup company, ad.ly, actually reached out to Sheen to get his tweets rolling. Ad.ly is a company that gets celebrities involved in social media advertising. With Sheen, they picked a winner. READ MORE Ad.ly has been helping Sheen navigate the twittersphere. But they’ve also been supplying him with a steady supply of drug money, estimated at $10,000 per tweet. If you’re one of the thousands following Sheen right now, you may have noticed some subtle (read: obvious) advertising on there. One post says, “I’m looking to hire a winning INTERN with TigerBlood” and links to the job posting on internship.com. Brilliant or exploitive? Well, both. But if you’re looking to kick-start a company or get your message out there, we can’t deny that it works. The cult of celebrity is strong in America, and access to the rich and famous can help your business like nothing else. Just imagine if Lady Gaga had said, “When I get dressed in the morning, I only wear Boar’s Head.” We’re hesitant to say that companies should go for it and try to nail down Charlie Sheen as their spokesman. After all, we have some sympathy: the man is clearly unstable. But in the end, we have to admit, he really is the ultimate advertising warlock. -Annie-Rose Strasser